Genius

I’m mulling over our plans for the fall around here.  Soccer, no soccer.  Karate, no karate…

And I came across this blog entry from another blog.

It’s genius.

And it’s true.

Of course, I teach piano lessons around here and while it’s painful… it’s cheap.

So, why do we depend on other people to do this for us?

I think I need to have a talk with my little peeps. :)

Thoughts?

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Comments

  1. says

    I read that article just now. It’s interesting, but I think this year when so many people are suddenly taking a closer look at finances this is on everyone’s mind. My friend Aimee and I had talked about having our kids do swimming lessons and a gymnastics camp together. The cost of which was hard to swallow, but that guilt of not providing them with opportunities, or something, had us giving in. Even though we had picked relatively inexpensive camps.

    Then we had an epiphany. We’re just having a “camp” week ourselves. We’ll swim at Aimee’s pool in the mornings and take an outing together in the afternoon. Beach, Jelly Belly Factory, SF, Zoo, etc. It’s going to be fun, and cheap, and I’ll get to make memories with my kids rather than drop them off somewhere to make memories with their coaches. I think I’m as excited as they are!

  2. says

    I think it’s a great idea to teach your kids how to play sports or whatever on your own…to an extent. It’s great to play with them and make memories. It’s great when they play together. I have lots of fond memories playing with my family.
    But nothing can substitute the experience of being on a team. You can teach them all you want and they can be great on their own, but so many sports are team sports and it’s a different game when you have to learn to play with others. And I know for myself that I may know how to play, but I may not know how to coach. So for the basics I’d say sure teach them yourself. But you learn a lot from being on a team about working together, getting through differences, losing, etc.

  3. says

    I think this is how it should be. Seems like everything starts a little too young and too seriously anymore.

  4. says

    I don’t have my kids in anything besides music lessons and girl scouts. Girl scouts cost like 30 dollars for the entire year. And music is a priority around here.

    However, I refuse to teach my kids music lessons. I will budget for it. It is way too much emotional stress for me. But maybe that’s because I have girls. And it’s high drama. And I don’t play the violin either. :) But I did try to teach Chloe piano for a few months and it was a spectacular disaster.

  5. says

    My mom taught piano lessons, but a master teacher of hers once told her that children need both a parent and a teacher. To her, when parents taught their own kids it didn’t allow them enough “practice” time…it turned into more like lessons all the time. Not sure I agree, but that was her idea.

    Sports? I love the idea of teaching your kids on your own when they are young. The togetherness and bonds you build doing “fun, wholesome recreational activities” is what it’s all about. There is much to be said, however, for TEAM sports. You learn so many things by being part of a team of peers…cooperation, strategy, empathy etc. You play against other teams and learn to be humble when you lose and also when you win. You have another adult who sees something in you that you may not see in yourself…someone who is an “expert” who believes in you makes you reach further inside yourself and push through mental and physical barriers.

    Balance is clearly the key. We have nixed several sports that we don’t feel offered enough benefits to the time required to be involved. So far it’s worked for us.