Boy’s Adrift: School


I am definitely looking at my two boys with a new “eye” — just trying to figure out what goes on in their little heads.  It’s just like a mystery to me.  Sometimes a scary one. :)

Anyway, the first thing they bring up is school.  How we are pressuring small children to do SO much at school.  Now, I personally get my kids extremely ready for school.  I try to teach them how to be ready for school, rather then hoping that school is ready for them.  Needless to say, it doesn’t always work.  Conner, even in 5th grade, had a hard time sitting in his desk, and would just sometimes stand up and jump around.  Uh-huh… he’s a winner.

It really did make me wonder what would’ve happened if I’d held Conner back a year.  He was MORE then academically prepared for Kindergarten when he went, but maybe his body would’ve been more ready to be still.

It says that a girls brain at 3.5 is the same as a boy’s at 5 — as far as the sitting still and ready to do bookwork type brain skills.  Crazy, no?

They actually talk a LOT about boys only schools, and while I had always thought this seemed kind of fruitless… it makes a good case for it. How those schools can raise gentlemen – and how hard that is to do with boys and girls together.

BUT, I still believe most learning still happens at home.  Sure, my son learned about all the Greek myths at school, but I hope learning to be a gentleman is happening at home.  I think I juts need to focus a little bit more on those skills.

Anyone else have thoughts on boys at school?

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Comments

  1. says

    I don’t know if you’ve finished the book yet, but after reading it I was really thankful to be LDS.

    We do separate the boys from the girls during adolescence. The boys are asked to serve missions…kind of that “becoming a man” thing that many cultures have that Sax talks about in the book. They are given the Priesthood, which helps them learn to serve others, which is another important thing that Sax talks about.

    Anyway, I found it all very interesting. I enjoyed his case for single gender schools, but I think that it’s probably difficult to actually execute unless you’re very wealthy and live in a large metropolitan center. But, the idea of single gender classrooms is one that I think we could visit in our local schools.

    My friend gave a copy to the principal after she read it…I’m interested to know if he will read it and what he will think about it.

  2. says

    You might enjoy the book, Why Gender Matters, by Leonard Sax.

    http://www.amazon.com/Why-Gender-Matters-Teachers-Differences/dp/038551073X

    Leonard Sax also has a few websites you might want to check out:

    http://www.whygendermatters.com/
    http://www.leonardsax.com/

    By the way, he does advocate for single gender classrooms. He believes (and I agree) that education has been feminized so that it is at times hostile to boys.

    I loved the book. It really helped me understand that boys are not “broken” because they are different from girls.

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